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Craig Whitlock

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LA Westside Sales Highlights - August 2018

by Craig Whitlock

This report will provide a quick overview as to how the Westside micro-markets are currently performing and then compares that data to the same period a year ago.  The key market indicators are:

Pending Sales Activity - sometimes referred to as the 'Number of Properties Under Contract'. This is a forward-looking indicator of current sales activity where there has been an accepted offer and escrow has opened.

Median Sales Price - that point at which half of the properties have sold for a greater amount and half have sold for a lesser amount. This indicator pinpoints where in the price spectrum homes have sold rather than reflecting home value. There is a common misperception that a drop in the MSP directly indicates a drop in home value. It is far more likely that the drop indicates either smaller, older and/or homes in lower-priced areas have sold during the period.

Months Supply of Inventory (MSI) - a leading indicator of market supply, which directly impacts pricing. Generally, a five to six month supply indicates market equilibrium while anything less signals a 'seller's market' and anything above a 'buyer's market'.

 © 2010–2018 10K Research and Marketing®

To view a portfolio of three additional reports trended over the past 12 months: Properties For Sale, Days On Market and New Properties For Sale, visit the Market Sales Data section. If you have any questions or would like to discuss this data at greater length, just drop me a note or give me a call.

7 Low-Cost Ways To Add Storage To A Cluttered Home

by Julian Lane

 

Moving to a bigger house isn’t the only solution to a lack of space at home. If you need more storage, you can add it without increasing your square footage, paying monthly fees for a storage unit, or throwing out all your stuff. You can even save money while doing it! Here are seven low-cost ways you can add storage to any home.

Get Things Off the Floor

Nothing shrinks your home’s usable space more than storing items on the floor. When you move stuff off of the floors and onto the walls, you instantly increase your square footage and make your home look tidier. If you’re looking for some low-cost wall storage solutions, check out retailers like The Container Store, which specializes in helping you stay organized.

Mount Pegboard in Closets

If all your stuff is stacked on shelves and hung on hangers, you’re not making the most of your closet space. Install pegboard inside of closet doors to store accessories, cleaning products, craft and office supplies, and other small items. Don’t assume you’re limited to things that can hang on hooks: You can use pegboard as a base for baskets, shelves, and a variety of other storage solutions. Learn more and find DIY instructions at Family Handyman, and take advantage of savings and deals at stores like Lowe’s to save some money.

Stick Caddies Inside Cabinet Doors

When you like to cook, your kitchen cabinets quickly become a black hole of spices and baking goods. Add space and make it easy to find what you need by adding caddies to the inside of cabinet doors. Adhesive caddies by 3M Command are a great budget option, but they’re not the most stylish solution. For a more attractive alternative, look for over-the-door organizers at a retailer like Bed, Bath & Beyond. You’ll spend a little more, but with online coupons and some cashback rewards, you can still get a great price.

Color-Coordinate Storage Bins

Stylish storage boxes and baskets take clutter and turn it into décor. And since the contents are concealed within the container, you can use storage bins to stash anything from spare blankets to the contents of your junk drawer. Crate & Barrel is a good place to stock up on chic storage solutions, and they frequently offer discounts or you can find additional savings through promotions so you never have to pay full price.

Make DIY Hanger Chains

Is your closet bulging with hangers full of clothes? Add more hanger space to an undersized closet by using chains and S-hooks to create a vertical hanging system for clothing. Brit + Co demonstrates how you can do it on your own.

Store Dry Goods in Jars

Organize a cluttered pantry by storing dry goods like beans, grains, and pastas in jars, rather than the boxes and bags they came in. When your pantry staples are organized in matching containers, it only takes a glance to see what you have in stock. You don’t have to buy new jars for storage! You can save money by reusing glass jars from pasta sauces, pickles, and other jarred foods. If you’re set on classic mason jars, search for coupons online before you buy.

Build Floating Shelves

If you’re handy with power tools and have wall space to spare, floating shelves are a stylish storage solution that suits a wide variety of interior design themes. Learn how to construct floating shelves using these instructions, then find ways to save on materials.

Whether you’re living in a small apartment or simply have more stuff than your home can handle, there’s a budget-friendly solution for increasing your storage space without moving house. If these tips don’t solve your storage shortage, try one of House Beautiful’s space-savvy organization ideas. Better yet, come up with a DIY solution of your own!

Image via Unsplash

Article courtesy of Julian Lane @TheFixitChamp.com

The Best Offer May Be Your First Offer

by Bob Hunt

Sometimes when everything goes right we have trouble accepting that fact. Perhaps nowhere is this phenomenon more clearly illustrated than in the case where a seller receives a good offer right away.

The annals of real estate are well stocked with stories of sellers who refused to take a good, but not perfect, first offer, and who then waited a long, long time before finally accepting something else at a considerably lower price. And most agents who have been around for a while know to shudder when a good strong offer is made almost at the outset of a listing; for the seller's reservations are almost inevitable. "Did we list it too low?" "If someone will offer this much so soon, maybe we should wait a while and see if we can get more." Etc..

When we read of Silicon Valley listings routinely selling at above list price, and while we are still in a period when multiple-offer situations are commonplace, it is understandable that such thoughts come to mind. Nonetheless, they are generally unfounded, especially if the market is anywhere near "normal", as ours is today.

As an antidote to the ill effects of the "curse of the first offer", a couple of observations might be kept in mind.

First, the fact that an offer is received early in the listing period -- even in the first few days -- doesn't mean that the property has been listed too low.

It is easy to overlook how very efficient the residential real estate marketplace has become. Modern multiple listing systems (MLS) provide agents, and thus their buyer clients, with virtually instant access to information about existing inventory and about what has newly come on the market. In the old, old days a buyer's agent did not become aware of new listings until "the book" (i.e. the compilation of MLS listings) was published. There might have been a lag time of ten days or more from the time the listing was taken.

Today, most buyer's agent will have electronically entered a "profile" of his client's needs and price range into the system. Then, whenever he logs on to the MLS, he will be notified if a listing has been entered that matches that profile. In a low-inventory market such as we have now, buyers' agents will log on a half-dozen times a day, or more, to see if an appropriate new listing has been entered. Moreover, in most systems the buyer's agent is able to place the buyer himself on a similar notification.

The point is that potential buyers learn quickly of the existence of an appropriate new listing. Thus a flurry of activity at the outset of the listing does not necessarily imply a too-low price; rather, it reflects the efficiency of the system.

Secondly, an early first offer does not imply that the seller should hold out for full price.

We all know that there is typically a bit of a dance in the pricing and negotiating for a property. Sellers, with the concurrence of their agents, will usually list their property for an amount that is both higher than what they believe its value to be and higher than what they would be satisfied to receive. Why? Because they know that buyers almost always want and expect to pay less than the listed price

However, when an otherwise acceptable offer comes in near the outset of a listing period, sellers are frequently tempted to hold out for full price, or much closer to it than would normally be expected. Caution should be exercised in this regard.

For one thing, as we have noted, exposure of the property to buyers occurs pretty quickly nowadays, and sellers shouldn't assume that there are going to be more, much less higher, offers as the listing period progresses.

Secondly, there often can be a transactional benefit to "leaving something on the table." A real estate transaction is a process. These days, with inspections and disclosures, there are almost always "second negotiations" during the course of escrow. A buyer who feels ground down in the purchase negotiation may well be more difficult to deal with as other issues arise.

Don't Let Your Home Search Break Your Heart

by Realty Times

 

For those who are house-hunting, it can be a whirlwind romance that's hot from the minute you see the home's curb appeal. But don't let the seduction of a good-looking landscape make you want to tie the knot without a bit of courtship.

House-hunting for the "perfect" home in many ways is like looking for that perfect romance - very seldom does everything about your proposed mate match your desires. Things you love at first may later get on your nerves and become what you don't like so much later on. Does that mean the house is wrong for you? Not necessarily. It could be, but if you understand your tolerance level–what's most important to you in a home, and what you can't deal with at all - you are less likely to want to buy the wrong home.

Keeping these terms clearly defined and always on your mind will help you make smart choices even when some areas of the home tug at your heartstrings and say "buy me!".

House-hunting should be like dating. Take your time. Understand the critical must-haves, the not-so-important-but-I-kind-of-want-it, and the no-way, not-going-to-happen-in-this-lifetime.

One thing you can do to help streamline the process is to start making a list about the things you like about your current home. If you're renting, there may be features about the home, apartment, or planned-living development that you want to find again in the neighborhood where you're going to buy your home.

For instance, you might want a gated community or a townhouse that has certain luxury amenities. Moving to an isolated home that doesn't have the same type of amenities could be a real turn-off. Also, it might mean you have to pay more to get those same amenities that used to come with your rent. While this might not be a deal-breaker, it can certainly change the way you're used to living your life.

So, be sure to take it into consideration. Walking a short distance down the street to go to the gym, the pool, the steam room will be different from having to drive 20 minutes or more to go to a gym/spa that you also have to first pay an extra monthly membership.

Another thing to consider is how many times you've seen the home. Just like dating, you might have an instant attraction, but the more times you see your date, the more you discover. With a home, (just like with a prospective mate!) you need to see it a few times and at different times of the day.

This way you'll discover which rooms are dark and when or how loud the traffic is during rush hour. You might notice that there's a lot of commotion around the neighborhood because of nearby schools. Does this work with your lifestyle? Viewing a home and the surrounding neighborhood at various times of the day can be an eye-opener and can reveal just how much this home is a match with your lifestyle.

Just as you wrote down the things you like in your present residence, you should also make lists of things you want to avoid in the future and new things you hope to gain.

Remember, courtship doesn't have to last forever. Just as with romance, "the good ones will be gone if you wait too long!" So put a ring on... or rather, put an offer on that house!

Best Ways To Protect Yourself During A Move

by Jaymi Naciri

"I can't wait to move!"

How often do you hear someone say that? What they mean is they can't wait to be in their new place, all unpacked and organized and enjoying their new surroundings.

What they don't mean is, "I can't wait to spend a month packing up everything I own and hauling it into a truck we're going to drive across country when I've never driven anything larger than a mid-sized sedan, only to have to haul it all out, and into that new house. The new house that has two flights of stairs and narrow hallways. Don't get me started on unpacking boxes."

And what they REALLY don't mean is, "I can't wait for the movers to break a bunch of my things and lose a bunch of stuff." Pretty sure they also don't mean, "I can't wait for dishonest movers to delay my delivery and charge me quadruple my quote and then hold all my stuff hostage while I sit here helpless."

Think that could never happen to you?

"Last year, Massachusetts officials sued one moving company and New Jersey officials sued two for providing low-ball estimates and then grossly inflating fees after loading the trucks," said Consumer Reports. "One of the companies had threatened to auction the possessions of customers who didn't pay."

Added MarketWatch about the possibility of mover fraud: "Typically, a mover gives you an extremely low estimate over the phone or Internet without ever actually seeing what needs to be moved. You agree, they show up, load the truck with all your worldly possessions and then tell you it will actually cost a lot more. Then, they hold everything you own hostage on their truck until you cough up the extra cash."

Yes, moving can be fraught with challenge and frustration and even heartache. So how do you protect yourself? Here are some tips for a safe and fraud-free move.

 

 

Do your research

Proper preparation can help you ward off many of the issues that can turn a move into a nightmare, and that's starts with a healthy dose of research. You always want to ask for a referral rather than using an unknown. And not just anyone is qualified to give a referral, according to MSN.

"Ask your real-estate agent. The general consensus among moving professionals is that word of mouth is the best way to find a good mover," they said. "Real-estate agents know the ins and outs of the housing industry and are the most reliable sources. Realtors want to make sure that your (moving) transaction is a good one."

There are also websites dedicated to moving scams. "MovingScam.com maintains a ‘black list,'" they said, as well as a "message board filled with consumer experiences, bad and good."

Verify licensing and look for complaints

MSN recommends people who are moving investigate the companies they are looking at using. Interstate movers must be licensed by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

"Check with your area's Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been filed and whether there are reliable," they said.

ProtectYourMove.gov also provides info on whether a mover's license is current "and if the company has ever had a federal complaint."

Watch out for the lowball bid

"You get what you paid for" is often a dangerous reality when it comes to moving. To protect yourself against unethical movers, get several estimates and make sure to weed out any that seem too low. Yes, the desire to save money is strong. But an unusually low bid is often a red flag.

"When shopping for movers, it's best to get at least three estimates, " said MSN. "If you've got one that's really, really low compared to the other two, you're going to know something's up."

Have a contingency plan

No matter how well you prepare, the unexpected can still happen. What if the truck doesn't show up on time? Are you prepared to live without your things for a few days, or longer? Make sure you pack a bag of essentials you can have with you while the rest of your stuff is stuck on the truck.

Protect yourself

The Better Business Bureau suggests paying a little extra for peace of mind.

"Consider accepting full value protection. It may cost a few dollars more up front, but it can eliminate headaches after your move," they said. "Purchasing full (replacement) value protection from your mover means any lost or damaged articles will be repaired or replaced, or a cash settlement will be made to repair the item or to replace it at its current market value, regardless of age. The cost of full value protection must be included in the initial estimate you receive for an interstate move."

For more information, visit: https://www.protectyourmove.gov

How Credit Scores Work

by David Reed

Consumers are encouraged to check their credit reports once per year. The primary reason for doing so is to make sure there aren't any mistakes. Unfortunately, credit reports are prone to contain mistakes. It's not really the fault of the three main credit repositories, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion because all three are just a database. Whatever is reported to them is what you see. Further, someone with a similar name can show up on someone else's report. If you're not the only Bob Smith in town, this is certainly possible.

Someone else's poor credit might very well be showing up on your report which can directly damage your credit scores. When you find an error work with your loan officer to get it fixed. Your loan officer has working relationships with credit agencies and can help get mistakes fixed and provide a method to get your scores back to where they should be.

But have you ever wondered how these scores are calculated in the first place? They follow an algorithm first developed by The FICO Company years ago. For a while, credit scores weren't the primary force behind a credit decision but over time the impact of a credit score became more and more important. Most every loan program available today has a minimum credit score and if a score falls below the minimum, there's some additional work that needs to be done to get those scores back on track.

There are five characteristics of your credit history that make up your three-digit score: your payment history, account balances, how long you've had credit, the types of credit used and how often you've applied for new credit over the past couple of years.

Credit scores range from 300 to 850. Let's say a borrower has a credit score of 600 but needs a 620 to qualify for a particular loan program. Credit scores will improve much more quickly by paying attention to the two categories that have the greatest immediate impact on a score- payment history and account balances.

Payment history accounts for 35 percent of the total score and account balances 30 percent. When someone makes a payment more than 30 days past the due date, scores will fall. An occasional "late pay" won't really do much damage to a score but continued payments made more than 30, 60 or 90 days past the due date definitely will. By stopping the late payments scores will begin to recover.

Account balances compares outstanding loan balances with credit lines. If a credit card has a $10,000 credit line and there is a $3,300 balance, scores will actually improve. The ideal balance-to-limit is about one-third of the credit line. As the balance grows and approaches the limit, scores will begin to fall and fall even more should the account balance exceed the limit. This category contributes 30 percent to the total score.

The remaining three have relatively little impact. How long someone has used credit accounts for 15 percent of the score but there's really nothing anyone can do to improve this area other than to wait. Types of credit and credit inquiries both make up 10 percent of the score. By concentrating on payment history and account balances, scores will improve significantly over the next few months.

LA Westside Sales Highlights - July 2018

by Craig Whitlock

This report will provide a quick overview as to how the Westside micro-markets are currently performing and then compares that data to the same period a year ago.  The key market indicators are:

Pending Sales Activity - sometimes referred to as the 'Number of Properties Under Contract'. This is a forward-looking indicator of current sales activity where there has been an accepted offer and escrow has opened.

Median Sales Price - that point at which half of the properties have sold for a greater amount and half have sold for a lesser amount. This indicator pinpoints where in the price spectrum homes have sold rather than reflecting home value. There is a common misperception that a drop in the MSP directly indicates a drop in home value. It is far more likely that the drop indicates either smaller, older and/or homes in lower-priced areas have sold during the period.

Months Supply of Inventory (MSI) - a leading indicator of market supply, which directly impacts pricing. Generally, a five to six month supply indicates market equilibrium while anything less signals a 'seller's market' and anything above a 'buyer's market'.

LA Westside Sales Highlights - July 2018 © 2010–2018 10K Research and Marketing®

To view a portfolio of three additional reports trended over the past 12 months: Properties For Sale, Days On Market and New Properties For Sale, visit the Market Sales Data section. If you have any questions or would like to discuss this data at greater length, just drop me a note or give me a call.

Understanding Resistance To Change In Real Estate

by PJ Wade

Resistance to change is common for buyers and sellers. This may seem surprising since both buying and selling mean seeking out a move with many related changes, but resistance is common none the less.

Buying and selling real estate involve many complex decisions packed full of real estate terminology, all of which are new territory for most buyers and sellers.

Add the pressure of time-sensitive decisions and the stress of dealing with huge amounts of money (much of it borrowed) and most buyers and sellers are way out of their comfort zones.

Does resistance in buyers and sellers make more sense now?

Too often, making no decision or a "no" decision may seem less stressful for buyers or sellers than agreeing to the significant changes related to entering into a real estate transaction. Fear of making the wrong decision can result in resistance and indecision which could cost thousands:

  • Sellers who receive their first offer — especially very soon after the house is listed — may worry they are selling too cheaply. Resistance can lead to the seller wanting "to wait and see" if a higher offer will appear. Sellers may second guess their decision to sell. Resulting stubbornness can materialize as illogical resistance to offer price, move-in date, or to giving up light fixtures or other items a buyer includes in their offer to purchase.
  • Buyers who have seen a property which meets their wish list must-haves, may still be resistant to making an offer, especially if it's their first offer or one of the first houses they view. Resistance leads to wanting "to see more houses" as if there's a magic number of viewings before a dream house appears. Resistance may also materialize as stubborn refusal to increase their offered purchase price for a seemingly-ideal property a few hundred or a few thousand dollars to meet the sellers half way. Buyers have been know to walk away from deals if the appliances, lighting fixtures, or other "must haves" they ask for in the offer are denied them by the seller. Ask your real estate professional about their experience with deal-breaking battles over furnishings and details.

Resistance is common under stress, even the best stress.

Real estate professionals will do their best to help buyers and sellers face their fears and overcome their resistance. Closing or decision-making techniques can help buyers or sellers realize where true value lies for them. In the hands of trained, ethical professionals, closing techniques can be communication and decision-making aids. (Caution: Unscrupulous individuals can use these simple exercises to manipulate or mislead — care is essential!)

For instance, one closing technique involves reducing a small disputed difference in purchase price like $1500 to its cost per day over a year. In this case, $1500 is $4.11 a day. Compare that amount to common purchases like a cup of coffee to put the financial decision in perspective. Or, relating that dollar difference to the cost per month on the mortgage payment, rather than cash out of hand, may also help.

Resistance leads individuals to "I'd like to sleep on it" reactions. It's not that they expect to win the Lottery overnight. This stress-related stall provides mental breathing room but unless issues are addressed, clear thinking does not automatically result. The problem is usually lack of confidence in decision making, not in the property.

Unfortunately, in real estate, delays can cost buyers a "dream" property or sellers a dream offer. Decisive buyers and sellers will snap up opportunities while others hesitate.

When experiencing resistance, ask yourself why you're having this reaction to put these feelings in perspective. Often the bigger the decision or resulting change, the greater the resistance:

  • What are you being asked to let go of or to release?
  • What must you face in its place?
  • How real are related fears?
  • How real are perceived benefits of proceeding with the transaction?

Enlist the expertise of your real estate professional in assessing the true benefits and weaknesses of the decision to buy or sell a specific property. Question their responses. Ask for market statistics and analysis of area trends.

  • Spend equal time and energy analyzing what is gained by not buying or selling the real estate in question. How special is this property anyway?
  • How much of the hesitation is related to uncertainty in your personal life or relationship? Is this really the best time to buy or sell? Don't just ask these questions. Get to work and decisively tease out answers.

Usually, this deep, clear thinking reveals the true value of benefits and gains in taking the plunge to buy or sell.

More than one experienced real estate professional has suggested the 51% rule can make sense when homes are involved. That is, "more sure" than "not sure," with slight but exhilarating uncertainty regarding the adventure ahead. That's real estate ownership.

Tips For Creating A Great Home Office

by Jaymi Naciri

A home office is one of the most in-demand home features today and continue to rise in popularity as more and more people work from home (or bring their work home!). A new report from Upwork found that nearly two-thirds of companies today have remote workers, and, according to Forbes, more and more Americans are quitting their day jobs to start their own businesses.

But creating a home office that functions well takes more than simply dragging an old desk out of the garage and pulling up a dining chair. The right elements can help you work better and more efficiently.

The right spot

You don't always have the option of choosing the location for your home office; your place may already have a dedicated space. But if you are choosing between a few locations, consider this: "You'll likely spend many hours in your home office, so don't stiff yourself on space (e.g. squishing a tiny desk into a windowless closet to preserve the rarely-used guest room)," said HGTV. "Also consider traffic flow and your ability to withstand distractions. Do you work best in the thick of activity, or should your office be tucked away in a quiet space? If clients will be stopping by, a private space with ample seating is a must."

The right privacy

Even if you're a "keep the door open" type, having one you can close when you need to mega-concentrate or take a phone call is key to creating a functional home office. If your home doesn't have a dedicated office space and there isn't a bedroom you can convert, a dining room may be your best bet. Many families today don't use their dining room, especially if they have a breakfast nook and/or an island with eating bar. Adding glass doors to the room will give you privacy without visually closing off the space.

The right chair

When you're sitting for hours a day, you want to be comfortable. A supportive chair is worth the expense to ensure you're not fidgety and distracted, and that you don't end up with a back injury. "Don't underestimate the power of a good chair," said Forbes. "The right support, while working, can help you prevent postural problems, like back pain, later on. If you want to be trendy, you can try to use a stability ball, or if you're interested in avoiding the problems with sitting in general, you can invest in a standing desk. In any case, you need a comfortable, healthy way to work."

The right color

You probably don't want to paint your home office a color that clashes with the rest of your decor, especially if it's visible from other parts of the house. But expressing some individuality in the space can help fuel creativity and productivity. "Colors and moods are interconnected, and the psychological impact of color should be considered when interior designers work with home owners to select a color palette," said Harrington College of Design. "When chosen with care, paint colors can enhance the atmosphere of every room in the house. Blue is a great color choice for a home office or study because it creates a soothing, relaxed and comfortable setting. Blue also helps maintain concentration, lowers your heart rate and boosts productivity."

The right storage

Remember you can use vertical space to make up for a lack square footage and give you more storage options.

The right mix of personality

Sure, your home office is a professional place where important stuff gets done. But don't forget to put a little "you" into it. Studies show that we work better when surrounded by things that make us happy. "Incorporate elements you love into the design," said Glassdoor. "Most corporate offices don't allow you to decorate your space. You might get to have a family picture at your desk, but not much else.

At home, though, you are at liberty to decorate your office any way you like."

The right light

Lighting is essential for being able to see properly, obviously. Too little light can create eye strain and headaches, so make sure you have a good mix of overhead and task lighting. But don't forget about the natural light.

"When putting a new desk into a home office, a lot of people kind of reflexively put it right up against the wall in the darkest corner of the room," said Linda Varone, author of The Smarter Home Office, on Fast Company. "What they've inadvertently done is recreated the corporate cubicle. And who wants that? Move your desk close to the windows, but place it parallel to the panes. This ideal set-up gives you the happiness benefits of natural light, and a good reason to turn away from your computer every few minutes to take in the scene."

The right supplies

Just like you do a regular inventory of your kitchen essentials to keep the fridge and pantry well-stocked, you want to do the same in your office. "Don't let yourself get hung up because you ran out of printer ink or can't find a pen," said Small Biz Trends. "A functional office needs supplies and the proper equipment to function."

Follow This Plan To Boost Your Credit

by Daniel Yelovich

It happens to the best of us: a few years of reckless spending, or a few missed credit card payments, and our credit score is a little less than appealing. If you're looking to purchase a home in the next few years, this can be discouraging. But don't worry - you can boost your credit in less time than you may think.

"Banks like to see a credit score of 640 or more, with scores of 740 and above in the best range," says Daniel Yelovich, a licensed mortgage loan officer.

To boost your score, Yelovich advises sticking to the following plan:

- Pay any overdue bills and stay up to date with future payments.
- Pay all bills within 30 days of their due date to avoid an overdue flag appearing.
- Set up payment plans where necessary as on-time, consistent payments are pivotal.
- Keep credit card balances under 50 percent of their maximum as going above this will hinder credit scores.
- Avoid opening unnecessary new credit accounts as frequent credit inquiries negatively affect credit scores.
- Call any creditor if there's likely to be a problem paying your bill on time.

Yelovich stresses that once mistakes on an individual's report are corrected, their score could be improved in as little as two weeks. "However, even where credit has been badly neglected," he adds, "most individuals can achieve a mortgage-worthy score of 640 within 12 months by following the above guidelines."

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 263

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Craig Whitlock
COLDWELL BANKER BRENTWOOD
11661 San Vicente Blvd., 10th Floor
Los Angeles CA 90049
Mobile: (310) 488-4399
Fax: (310) 820-1457

Broker/Agent does not guarantee the accuracy of the square footage, lot size or other information concerning the conditions or features of properties provided by the seller or obtained from Public Records or other sources as presented in this website.  Interested parties are advised to independently verify the accuracy of all information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.  Information herein deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

CalBRE LIC 01827537